Employment Do’s and Don’ts

Employment Do’s and Don’ts 9 Comments 

Choose Work That Fits Your Nature

By Oct 17,2014 Follow Me on Google+
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Summary
Everyone has a distinct nature and view of the world; you must understand yours, and choose a lifestyle and work that matches your outlook. Jobs and coworkers who do not match your nature, acting outside of your nature, or trying to be something that you are not will only leave you unhappy. Your nature will likely never change regardless of outside conditioning, so you will achieve your greatest success in a job that you love.

Young Woman Signing Documents at Car Dealership with Salesman

For as long as I can remember, I have always sat in an office with someone else. For me, this is a useful way to work because various things come up throughout the day and as these issues come up, I want to ensure that I have someone to bounce ideas off of.

I have shared offices with all sorts of people throughout the years. I once shared an office with a guy who was an extremely loud typist. He would bang on the keyboard all day long. He was also very loud when he spoke on the phone, and when he was done speaking, he would always slam the phone down. When he was not on the phone or typing loudly, he would be sighing, putting his head to his hands, and getting all uptight about something. He did this for practically every e-mail and letter he opened. When he would get up from his chair, he would aggressively push his chair back toward his desk.  He would open sodas all day long and loudly slurp them down. In addition, he ate small snacks all day long and frequently got up to eat them.

There was nothing wrong with this guy. In fact, he was very successful back then and he is still very successful today. Nevertheless, I hated working with him.

At first, I tried to change him:

  • I ordered him an expensive “silent” keyboard from some weird store online.
  • I spoke to him on several occasions about being quieter.
  • I brought a clock radio from home and put it in the office with a classical radio station on to try to sooth him.
  • I taped some felt on his telephone receiver to try to make his telephone conversations quieter.

Despite all of these efforts, none of it worked. Why do you think it did not work? It did not work because being loud and finicky was his nature. He was the way he was and it is nearly impossible to change someone’s nature.

I moved him into another office, moved someone quiet into my office, and everything worked out perfectly.

Imagine what would have happened had I continued trying to change this guy. I could have spent months telling him to be quieter. I could have brought this up in performance reviews. I could have requested he start exercising during lunch so he would be more relaxed and, therefore, quieter. I could have made him drink sodas and eat snacks outside the office.

If I had really been serious about changing this man, my idea is that we would have both been extremely unhappy. He would not have liked constantly feeling inferior and might have felt like a second-class citizen. I might have made him feel inadequate and as if there was something wrong with him. There was nothing wrong with this guy—he was the way he was because of his nature.

  • Some people are very talkative and excitable in an office setting.
  • Other people tend to be very mellow, speak quietly, and never get flustered.
  • Other people are something in between.

Regardless of what a person is, you generally are not going to be able to condition someone to be something different from who they are.  They are who they are because of their nature. Everyone has a nature and a way of being. Regardless of what you do, it is important that you realize your nature and you live and work in a way that matches your nature.

How many people put themselves in jobs and situations that do not match their nature?  Whatever your nature is, it is you and nothing really remarkable is ever going to happen until you embrace your nature. A job that does not match your nature, and working with people who do not appreciate your nature, is a recipe for disaster.

Most people spend the majority of their time at work. Work is life. In order to have an extraordinary life, nothing is more important than enjoying your work to the absolute fullest. If you enjoy your work, you enjoy your life. In order to enjoy your work, you need to (1) do work that is in your nature, and (2) work with people who support your nature.

While I have heard various statistics thrown around, I would estimate that less than 50% of people are satisfied with their work. People who do not like what they are doing for a living:

  • Come home at the end of each day not excited about starting the next day of work; and,
  • When working, are excited for the day to end.

To have a truly satisfying life, you should enjoy your work. If you enjoy your work, you also enjoy your life. Work that you enjoy gives your life meaning and it also makes you feel alive. Arguably, we were put on earth to work and the meaning we get in life comes from growing and giving.

A massive problem in life comes when we think our nature is wrong and that something else is better. Anytime we are acting outside of our nature and trying to be someone we’re not, we are likely to be unhappy. For example, if you tend to be introverted and are in a job that requires you to be extroverted you will be unhappy. Being introverted is your nature. Why would you do a job that is not in your nature? This is simply not who you are. No matter how much someone tries to condition you to be someone different, your nature in all likelihood will never change.

Most people pick their career and life paths unconsciously and due to things like (1) expectations of those around them, (2) the environment they grew up in, and (3) the proximity of the job to them—instead of based on what their nature is.  When you talk to most people and ask them what they do for a living, you’ll get many different responses. Ask someone why he or she is a doctor, a businessperson, a teacher, or something else and the answer you get will often be a mishmash of statements including:

  • My parents did the same work.
  • It was the best job I could get.
  • I got the job through a friend.
  • I did not know what else to do.

None of these are reasons to be doing a certain career. A good reason is that it is something you love and that gets you excited and is in your nature. When you are doing something you really love and that fits with your nature, time often flies faster. You look forward to going to work.

If you seek happiness, you need to choose work that fits your nature.

THE LESSON

For a step-by-step guide to transforming your career in just 44 days—including interviewing, where to find jobs people are not applying to, negotiating the best offers and strategies for the on-the-job success—check out Harrison Barnes' Career Transformation System.

Everyone has a distinct nature and view of the world; you must understand yours, and choose a lifestyle and work that matches your outlook. Jobs and coworkers who do not match your nature, acting outside of your nature, or trying to be something that you are not will only leave you unhappy. Your nature will likely never change regardless of outside conditioning, so you will achieve your greatest success in a job that you love.

  • Yash

    I totally agree with the article. I took MBTI tests recently, and am working on self-development by doing what I should do by nature of my personalities. If I can find a career in the line of self-develpment, that is the best way, I believe.

    Yash did not rate this post.
  • Robert Rivas

    I can’t seem to get off your spam list. The unsubscribe doesn’t work, and nobody from your company responds to my emails. Can anybody help? I don’t want to get any more LawCrossing spam.

    Robert Rivas did not rate this post.
  • keith Santillo

    Harrison: Good article. I especially agreee with the statement -To have a truly satisfying life, you should enjoy your work. If you enjoy your work, you also enjoy your life. Work that you enjoy gives your life meaning and it also makes you feel alive. Good advice. And it is precisely what I’ve been attempting to do. However, the law is a strange profession. If you started out as a litigator doing plaintiff’s personal injury work because that was the only position available in a tight job makret, then you’re labeled “a personal injury attorney or, at best Litigator. If you started out practicing corporate finance, then you’re a corporate finance lawyer, or if you started you legal career as a Prosecutor, then you’re a criminal attorney. After 17 years as an attorney, I have found it IMPOSSIBLE to change my area of practice, let alone my actual career. I continue to hear you don’t have experience doing X or you’re a Lawyer, not an Banker or such and such, although my training and education would give me the ability to succeed in just about any business field- obvioulsy with a bit of a ramp up time to learn what it is I need to perform the job successfully and competently. The point here is Learn-that’s what I’ve done my entire career. That’s what Lawyers are trained to do…think critically and learn. So, I’m confident that I would be able to learn the nuances of any new legal area or position and probably more quickyly than someone without an education that requires you to think critically. However, based on my job search results to date,I get the distinct feeling that the mind-set of potential employer is..you practice law-you’re a LAWYER. It appears to me that employers…and recruiters can’t see beyond the labels that have been attached to us as a consequence of our practice area or field. I’ve been attempting to utilize my legal training at a leading law school, formal business education and work experience in the Broker-Dealer field-as a Financial Advisor-to do Broker Dealer Compliance work, FINRA Arbitration Claimants or defense work and or High Net Worth Investment consulting. But, I can’t get anyone to consider me for these positions for want of experience. So I’m back to looking for a Plaintiff’s Personal Injury Attorney position….and more frustration. I would welcone your sincere comments or helpful suggestions.

    keith Santillo did not rate this post.
  • http://Facebook Rohit Ranjan

    I think You are absolutely right.People has to choose their job according to there nature.I feel good to read this.
    Warm regards
    Rohit Ranjan

    Rohit Ranjan did not rate this post.
  • MK Ultra

    This is a very interesting article, full of common sense and wisdom. However, the problem is that the employer and work places who are as understanding, open-minded and accommodating as the author are few and far apart. In the real world, if you don’t fit in, they hit you over the head in an attempt to make you in their image but, often times, they just simply fire you and blame you for whatever it is that they don’t like. And that is the reality of the inhumane, impersonal, cut-throat world we live in.

    MK Ultra did not rate this post.
  • Matt

    A very true and insightful artice.

    Matt did not rate this post.
  • Monica

    I chose law after a journalism career because my skills of writing, analyzing, and questionning were transferable. My business skills are still minimal.
    I need to make some money! My solo practice (after 10 years inhouse) brings in a parttime income. Over the past 15 years, I switched from M

    Monica did not rate this post.
  • Dawn Weiland

    Thank you for this article. It was very interesting to me. I was recently employed at a job where I constantly felt inadequate and unappreciated by my immediate supervisor. It was very disheartening and frustrating every day I went to work. I hated going in and I couldn’t wait to go home. I’m a hospice nurse in the home care setting. I was working as a palliative care nurse (home health, not hospice). I was working with patients trying/hoping to “get better”, but my ‘love’ or ‘passion’ or ‘calling’ (if you will) is helping others in an environment of accepting their life limiting prognosis, and my job was to help them through this journey. The focus was very different, and I did not expect it to actually Be very different when I accepted the position. When a hospice nurse quit, I was assigned her patients. It was then that I realized why I had been so miserable and unhappy. I am now working as a hospice nurse exclusively again, and your article confirmed my experience. Thanks, Dawn

    Dawn Weiland did not rate this post.
  • Michael Tine

    Hello, Sir Barnes,

    I feel everyday the importance of the meaning of your messages. I should add that now I get enthusiasm to keep on going from them. I haven’t seen a reason to give up. Who follows you, follows the good way to succeed in his life. Please allow me to talk about what I want in my career or job if possible: good conditions of working, respect, trust, job rights, health insurance, security, good conditions of living, salary of equivalent jobs, assurance after the normal age of working, to live with my wife (fiancée) like we do now in our country (Sénégal)…Why do I choose you?

    You are a person I know something about now. I know you through your messages and advice you send me, and I trust in you. You are not only a teacher for me, but now I regard you like a member of my own family. I shorten my message in hope that you can understand what I mean to say…

    Have a good day! Thanks to all!
    Gratefully yours Michael Tine

    Michael Tine did not rate this post.

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