Finding a Job

Finding a Job 2 Comments 

Download PDF

Finding Jobs Through Contacts

By Feb 12,2014 Follow Me on Google+

View Count: 1486

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Summary
In this article Harrison discusses the importance of networking in a job search. While Harrison has advocated and worked on a varied range of job search tools, he is very clear that use of contacts in your job search continues to be your best bet. Once you’ve identified all your past contacts that can help you in your job search, start re-establishing contacts with them. Update them on your career without letting them know of your job search intentions. Once people find out that you are available, referrals come your way without even your asking for them. Connecting with people may get you your dream job without using any job search service.

finding-jobs-through-contacts

I work in the employment industry and a large part of my business is devoted to (1) helping people identify job opportunities through consolidating job listings from hundreds of sources, (2) creating new résumés and cover letters for people from scratch and (3) mass mailing résumés to targeted employers that match the interests and the geographical preferences of the applicants. However, I believe one of the best ways for people to get a job is by utilizing their own personal contacts.

The easiest way to procure work through people you know is to simply send an email, or pick up the phone, and (I am not kidding) speak with these people about nothing at all. If the subject of your job search comes up during the conversation, great. If it does not, that’s fine too. I feel this simple tactic may be the easiest way to get a job that I know of.

In sales, one of the things I’ve seen over and over is that salespeople are always the most excited about new leads. Salespeople spend most of their time trying to find new people to buy products and are mostly concerned with people who appear ready to buy right here and now. I see this a lot in automobile sales, for example. Picture an auto dealership where you pull up to find 10+ salespeople standing outdoors waiting to ask if they can help you. Imagine instead, if each time someone came into the dealership, the salesperson asked them for their contact information? What if that salesperson proceeded to call all his compiled contacts periodically to see if they were interested in a new car? Imagine the number of contacts this salesperson would have after 30, 60, 90, or 180 days. Would this make a difference for his sales?

This is, in fact, what the greatest car salesman of all time, Joe Girard, did in his work–he never let a customer out of his grip. According to one website:

After building homes for 13 years, Girard turned to autos. He sold cars from 1963 to 1977, starting at 267 units a year, rising to an all-time record of 1,425 units, and retiring at 855 units to write books. Girard had his own office at the dealership and hired two assistants out of his pocket, one to help recruit and market sales, one to prep new cars, assess trade-ins, and coordinate service requests. He sent out nearly 13,000 greeting cards a month to his customers, celebrating everything from Halloween to Groundhog Day. He paid out thousands to a network of people who referred sales–priests, teachers, plant foremen, students, and mechanics–before the practice was discouraged by the Big Three.

What

 job title, keywords

Where

 city, state, zip



This sort of follow up–making sure that people remember you and staying in touch, is what truly builds relationships, and, in the sales market, is what translates into results. There are lessons here that can be learned regarding the job market in general as well.

Throughout your life and career, chances are you’ve met innumerable individuals who can assist you in your job search. Many of these people have job openings they can help you interview for, or know people who can assist you in finding employment. Look at your life and the people you have known in the past. How many people have you lost track of? How many of those do you wish you would have kept in touch with? Imagine what a difference it would make if you could reactivate just 10 or 15 percent of your old professional contacts to come to your aid in your job search.

You certainly can find jobs by hanging out on a job board or contacting employers directly. You can also find jobs by doing a targeted mass-mailing to employers. And still, one of the best ways to find a job is by networking with people who already know you or you’ve known in the past. Re-establish as many connections as you can while you are conducting your job search. It can only help you.

Once you have identified those who may be able to assist you in your job search, I would recommend you very earnestly and deliberately re-establish contact with them. Send an email or place a call to them and reconnect, then simply update them on what you are doing. You do not need to tell these people you are looking for a job at the start of the conversation–it will come up as the conversation progresses. Most people are inclined to want to help, or at the very least, offer career advice.

Everyone wants acknowledgment and needs to be heard. Part of what you’re doing when you contact people you’ve spoken with in the past is acknowledging them. If it’s your fault you haven’t spoken with them in a long time tell them so, and apologize. You have everything to gain and nothing to lose by contacting people from your past and enlisting them in your job search. Very often, you will find you need not even ask for help. Just letting people know you are searching is often enough. Once people realize you are available, you may find referrals come your way without even looking for them.

I am a major proponent of using every means necessary to find a job. Our websites are a valuable tool for many job-seekers. In the end however, what it really comes down to when you want a job is people and relationships. People are the ones who give you jobs–not computers, not letters or email. Your contacts are one of your greatest assets.

Get people in your corner. Enlist everyone you can in your job search. Contact those you know from your past (professionally and personally) to chat about how they are doing. The reward for human interaction and putting yourself out there is you’ll know the market better. And you may just find your dream job–all without the aid of any job search service. This is how people typically found employment in the past; now may be just the time to get back to this way of doing business.

LESSON

In this article Harrison discusses the importance of networking in a job search. While Harrison has advocated and worked on a varied range of job search tools, he is very clear that use of contacts in your job search continues to be your best bet. Once you’ve identified all your past contacts that can help you in your job search, start re-establishing contacts with them. Update them on your career without letting them know of your job search intentions. Once people find out that you are available, referrals come your way without even your asking for them. Connecting with people may get you your dream job without using any job search service.

Read More About The People Who Leave Your Company Are Just as an Important Network as the People Currently at Your Company:

Resources
Search Employer Websites
Post Your Resume to 65+ Job Sites
Resume Service

For a step-by-step guide to transforming your career in just 44 days—including interviewing, where to find jobs people are not applying to, negotiating the best offers and strategies for the on-the-job success—check out Harrison Barnes' Career Transformation System.

You May Also Enjoy These Posts By Harrison Barnes

  • that’s well said . we as an aspirant job seekers we absuolutly agree that you empathize with us. This blog post is one of the most relevant and reliable ever came across. this would surely help us to find rewarding jobs

  • David

    Contacting former acquaintances for a possible new job has
    NEVER worked for me in 40 years of working. I wanted to move into something totally different and they always wanted to put me back into the same type work I’d been doing for years, but no longer wanted to do. They just didn’t get it, nor do they now. Baffled to say the least.
    Like they expect me to stay in the “employment box” I’ve worked in for years, but no longer want to. They don’t have the answer nor do I. Have been unemployed from full-time, permanent wokr for 2 years now. About to go on S.S. disablilty cause I’m all busted up from different things happening to the old bod over the years to the point I honestly can NO LONGER do what I did for 40 years, but yet people still want to keep me in the old employmnent box, even with me busted up. Makes absolutely no sense to me.

Filed Under : Finding a Job

Tagged: , , , , , , , ,

BCG FEATURED JOB

Attorney with 3-7 years of litigation experience

USA-IL-Chicago

Chicago office of our client seeks attorney with 3-7 years of litigation experie...

Apply Now

Defense Attorney with 3-4 years of litigation experience

USA-CA-San Francisco

San Francisco office of our client seeks defense attorney with 3-4 years of soli...

Apply Now

Mid-level IP Litigation Attorney with electrical engineering experience

USA-CA-San Francisco

San Francisco office of our client seeks mid-level intellectual property attorne...

Apply Now

TOP LEGAL JOB

  • SEARCH LEGAL JOBS

RELEVANT JOBS

Associate Attorney

USA-AL-Birmingham

Associate with three (3) to five (5) years of experience to work in its Architects / Engineers ...

Apply now

Associate Attorney

USA-AL-Birmingham

Associate to practice in the firm\'s Employment litigation group.  Three (3) to five (5) years ...

Apply now

Sr. Attorney I

USA-DC-Washington

To be part of the AMA is to be part of our Mission to promote the art and science of medicine and th...

Apply now

Job Market

The Dangers of Getting Jobs Through Friends

By on May 04,2017

Despite the obvious advantages, getting jobs through a friend or relative may ultimately harm you. When you do so, you risk lowering your colleagues’ opinions of you, who may see your connections as evidence that you lack the skills to get your position on your own merits. Nonetheless, there are situations in which it is acceptable to take advantage of such connections, but you must be on your guard; make sure that the job you get is a good fit, and one in which you would perform well regardless of your connections.

continue reading

recent posts

Related Posts:

Want Powerful Career Advice?

Get my free newsletter and strategies that make people successful




Subscribe!